A refined find of the archives

Housewife Mrs Juliana Rad, when she wanted to put a little bit of sugar in the meal, had to use the chopper to cut off a little piece from a big loaf of sugar. A short while of inattention was sufficient to cause injury. One day in August of 1841 it happened to Juliana who, cutting a loaf of sugar, she hurt her finger.

After, during a lunch she addressed her husband and other officials of the refinery present at the lunch, and appealed to them to find a way to eliminate difficult cutting and splitting loafs of sugar. She herself suggested to manufacture sugar in forms of cubes that are easy to count and stock.

It was certainly a nice surprise for her to receive from her husband in august of the same year a little box. There were 350 white and red cubes of sugar inside. The cube of sugar was born. Rad fabricated a press and on the 23rd of January 1843 he obtained a privilege to fabricate cube sugars in Decice. In autumn of 1843 the refinery in Dacice started to make cubes of sugar for business. For the first time, sugar cubes appeared in Vienna called “tea sugar”.

A little parcel containing 250 cubes weighed one pound and suggested a box with Chinese Tea. There were original labels on the box presenting refinery buildings in Dacice and was sold for 50 Kreutzers. The patent for the fabrication of cube sugar was bought soon by Prussia, Saxony, Bavaria, Switzerland and England. A perfected form of Rad’s invention is used by sugar refineries all over the world.

From SugarHistory

[I love this story: a man manufactures sugar, his wife refines it. He makes it for her, she’s made it so they’ve got it made for the rest of their lives.]

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